Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS16GSDHC10E)

Pinned on October 17, 2013 at 2:40 pm by Douglas Pounders

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Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS16GSDHC10E)

Transcend 16 GB SDHC Class 10 Flash Memory Card

The SDHC Class 10 series offer larger-volume data storage and optimized recording performance with support for FAT 32 file formats. With up to 16GB of storage, you can store your entire music or picture collection on today’s high-megapixel digital cameras, HDTV digital video cameras, PDAs and other memory-hungry devices.

Compatible with:

  • Transcend: SDHC

Product Features


Comments

Stephen says:

Great Value for the Price Update 3/6/2012 I own about 20 Transcend cards now. They have all worked without an issue untill today. I dread calling any company for return support because it usually is such a tortured experience…(Ever tried calling SanDisk for product support?) Withing 20 seconds of dialing I was connected to their representative Marc Crawford. He was able to quickly and clearly guide me to the support I needed. It was such a shockingly great experience that I wanted to pass it along to potential purchasers.UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because they are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial disappointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.If you own a compact digital camera, or SD/HD video camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn’t usually the slowest part of the data write process, it’s the camera.This card unloads very quickly with a 20MB/s read speed. You will need a SDHC card reader if you don’t have one. A standard SD card reader will not read a HC (high capacity) card.These cards make great gifts. I have given several of the 8 Gig cards as gifts and have received appreciation and great comments from all the recipients.UPDATED REVIEW:I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part. In order for a card to qualify for class 10 speed the card needs to be certified to have 10MB/s write and read speed. Some manufacturers classify their cards at a slower speed even though they qualify for a higher class. SanDisk make some cards that would qualify for class 10 and rates them as class 6.The product photo on Amazon does not have the card’s speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with “20MB/s” which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is 16MB/s.I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can’t stand to lose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can’t fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card. It is expensive.This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

Mike From Mesa "MikeFromMesa" says:

Fast, fast, fast! I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera – isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait – writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.


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